Tuesday, May 3, 2016

Gothic Gardening: Starting Your Gothic Indoor Herb Garden for Spring

Last week I did a post about creating your own goth garden! I noticed that I forgot about herbs. I know for most of us herb gardens are more manageable, especially those who live in apartments. I love having fresh culinary herbs on hand to snip into my dishes as I cook.

Take a look at some gloomy and dark herbs you can grow.

I absolutely adore basil and would love to grow these Red Rubin Basil - Heirloom Seeds. The beautiful dark purple color is one of my favorites. I wonder if this basil would make a good pesto for pasta, because purple pesto would be an awesome dish to make.

This is the same color as the previous basil strain. The flavor of the dark opal basil seeds is more savory than sweet. I can image putting this in stews or sauces.

This beautiful blood red Roselle Hibiscus Sabdariffa Herb Seeds would bring lots of flavor to pies, syrups, and teas. This is traditionally used in Jamaican drinks. You would think if you used this herb in tea that the color would fade, but it stays that gorgeous deep red hue!

This would be an interesting herb to add to any garden. The Red Yarrow Seeds are stunning in color. Also, they are actually medicinal. I like the fact that this can be used in everyday cooking and for health benefits!

These would be gorgeous herbs to grow: Red Amaranth. There are plenty of recipes that you can use red amaranth as. It brings an earthy flavor to many dishes and is a great addition!

One of my favorite flavors is cumin! The black cumin seeds have a bitter and pungent flavor. Delicious! There are medicinal uses for black cumin as well.

I've already started my herbal garden, but here's a little tray to help starters out. This Seed Starter Germination Station is a great way to begin.

I hope that these herbs enhance your garden or give you some idea of what to do on your own. The colors are dreadfully delightful. Remember to check out ideas for a goth vegetable garden!

2 comments :

  1. Great ideas, I'll definitely plant basil in the spring.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I just bought (and wrote a post about it) some gothy herbs. On recommendation, I purchased the Ruby Red Basil but I could not figure out if that and the Red Rubin Basil that you mentioned are the same. I'm guessing it is a regional name difference since the pictures look similar. I'm going to try to make pesto :D

    ReplyDelete